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Once again we brew in my room, this time we end up with 250 bottles. This is the beginning of M.B. (MalcolmsBasement) proposal # 003, Batch A. 

 For those looking for the basic brewing instructions check out the post: How to Brew Beer.

As per usual we start by sanitizing all equipment, this time we used Iodophor as a sanitizer, – unlike the pink chlorine based sanitizer (Sani-Bright), the Iodophor is not used as a cleaner as well.

This is what happens when you forget how to use a can opener.
Here are all 5 carboys, we made a 1) Nut brown ale, 2) English Bitter, 3)IPA, 4) Generic Ale  5) Lager.
 Around 250 bottles latter.
Total Cost
 In time: -It took around 4hours for us to make the wart, set up the carboys, and add the yeast.
 -It took around 7 hours to bottle them, including sanitizing bottles and doing the clean up of the carboys. 
Each time there was about 4 of us.
In $$$: – The entire cost of the beer kits, sugar, and liquid malt extract was about 100$ which works out to about 20$ per batch. Then you need to add the cost of the sanitizer and bottle caps used which would work out to about 10$ -Assuming you got all your bottles for Free.
This works out to around $0.44/ beer. – This is the average since one of the batches cost around $17 while another cost around $24.
Time wise… well 11hours x 3 people= 33hours –>
33h/250beer. Which works out to around 11min/beer.
That being said, we are trying to get the time down to 1min/beer. The $ should stay the same.

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So over the last 2 days, we have possibly made dandelion wine. Only time will tell.

Day 1

We picked the dandelions. In total, we picked 2Kg of dandelion heads, with bit of the stems. Nothing like 4 men picking dandelions in the park.

I would like to warn anyone who want to attempt this, the smell will not leave your hand for 2 day.

Day 2

After storing them in the fridge over night, it was time to remove the stems … sorta. It took around 1:30 to get around 3 1/2 liters ( non-compact) of dandelion heads with most but certainly not all, the green removed. We ended up only using around 2/3 of the amount we picked, the rest got frozen.

The Recipe?

After going through around 20 recipes, we decided to make our own. What we did is as follows:
Ingredients for 5 gallons

  •  3 1/2 liters of dandelions heads/petals.
  •  4 sliced oranges
  •  1kg of raisins (cut up)
  •  1/8 cup cut ginger root
  • 5 table spoons citric acid
  • 28 cups of sugar ( about 5kg)
  • 5 campden tablets 
  • 1 pack yeast -Lavin EC-118 ( sparkling wine)
  • 2 spoons of yeast energizer.
  • enough water to make it to around 5 gallons 

After properly sanitizing the 10 gallon primary, we mixed all the ingredients together Except the Yeast.  We dissolved the sugar in hot water first. The yeast will go in 24 hours later. This is because the campden  tablets are used to kill all unwanted yeast and bacteria that would interfere with the brewing process, if we were to add the yeast right away, it would die.

Campden?

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So after 6 days in the 6 gallon carboy, it was time to bottle. Note, never try to sanitize all the bottles in a bath tub, it will take you 3 hours. For next time, lets try using the sani-rinse on the dishwasher.

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A total of 60 bottles- we can only hope that they will carbonate, and not explode. We put 1/2 tsp sugar in each. Hopefully the yeast is still active.
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They will be ready in 1-2weeks
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So in the last week, I have started to brew 12L of Mead, and 23L of Beer! If the beer goes well, we (malcolmsbasement) will make a larger batch, maybe around 700 bottles.


So I’ll explain how to make mead real easy in a couple posts, just not now.

  So 3 days latter me and a friend thought it would be a good idea to buy more wine/beer equipment than we had any idea how to use.
So the morning after we made the test batch, I awake to the smell of beer. The brew was fermenting so fast that it blew the airlock right off. The solution is to replace it with a tube running into a adjacent container under some water, keeping the air out, put allowing for overflow.